This 90-Minute Morning Routine Will Make Your Workday More Productive

The biggest changes I’ve made in my life over the past couple of years, relates to how I now start a day. I loved this article, because have a nutritious and active start to the day has made a HUGE difference for me!  I now enjoy great quality breakfast and lunches which energize my day. Enjoy this…

These seven-step morning ritual will not only make you more productive but also more fulfilled.

Source: This 90-Minute Morning Routine Will Make Your Workday More Productive

peppers onions tomatoes

Freezing Vegetables (peppers, tomatoes and onions)

When buying large quantities of vegetables in the fall, here’s some great strategies for freezing sweet peppers, hot peppers, onions, and tomatoes.

Mandolin3I love to use my German-made mandolin – what a great implement for processing large amounts of vegetables (particularly during end-of-season harvest time, when vegetables are available in large quantities at bargain prices). If you’ve never seen these devices, check them out. I find it fantastic since it’s easy to use and simple to clean up (not much more work than a cutting board and knife).

Sweet Peppers

  1. Select crisp, tender peppers.
  2. Wash.
  3. Cut out stems and cut peppers in half.
  4. Remove seeds and membrane — save time by using a melon baller or the tip of a spoon to scrape out seeds and membrane.
  5. Cut peppers into strips, dice or slice, depending on how you plan to use them.
  6. peppers2Freeze peppers in a single layer on a cookie sheet with sides, about an hour or longer until frozen. This method is often referred to as “tray freezing.”
  7. Transfer to a “freezer” bag when frozen, excluding as much air as possible from the bag. The peppers will remain separated for ease of use in measuring out for recipes.
  8. Pour out the amount of frozen peppers needed, reseal the bag and return to the freezer.

Hot Peppers

hot peppersWash and stem hot peppers. Package, leaving no headspace. Seal and freeze. It is not necessary to cut or chop hot peppers before freezing.

Caution: The National Center for Home Food Preservation warns, “Wear plastic or rubber gloves and do not touch your face while handling or cutting hot peppers. If you do not wear gloves, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face or eyes.”

HOT TIP: If your mouth is burning from eating hot peppers, help put out the fire with milk and other dairy products.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes may be frozen whole, sliced, chopped, or puréed. Additionally, you can freeze them raw or cooked, as juice or sauce, or prepared in the recipe of your choice. Thawed raw tomatoes may be used in any cooked-tomato recipe. Do not try to substitute them for fresh tomatoes, however, since freezing causes their texture to become mushy.

Tomatoes should be seasoned just before serving rather than before freezing; freezing may either strengthen or weaken seasonings such as garlic, onion, and herbs.

Step 1. Preparation and Selection

Select firm, ripe tomatoes for freezing. Sort the tomatoes, discarding any that are spoiled.

Step 2. Wash Tomatoes

Tomatoes should be washed before cutting. To wash, wet each tomato with water, rub its surface, rinse it with running water, and dry it with a paper towel. After washing, cut away the stem scar and surrounding area and discard it before slicing or chopping the tomato.

Washing tomatoes in a sink filled with water is not recommended since contaminated water can be absorbed through the fruit’s stem scar. The use of soap or detergent is neither recommended nor approved for washing fruits and vegetables because they can absorb detergent residues.

Dry them by blotting with a clean cloth or paper towels.

Step 3.

Freezing whole tomatoes with peels: Prepare tomatoes as described above. Cut away the stem scar. Place the tomatoes on cookie sheets and freeze. Tomatoes do not need to be blanched before freezing. Once frozen, transfer the tomatoes from the cookie sheets into freezer bags or other containers. Seal tightly. To use the frozen tomatoes, remove them from the freezer a few at a time or all at once. To peel, just run a frozen tomato under warm water in the kitchen sink. Its skin will slip off easily.

Freezing peeled tomatoes: If you prefer to freeze peeled tomatoes, you can wash the tomatoes and then dip them in boiling water for about 1 minute or until the skins split. Peel and then freeze as noted above.

Onions

The following method works for fully mature onions:

  1. Wash, peel and chop raw, fully mature onions into about 1/2″ pieces. There is no need to blanch onions.
  2. Bag and freeze in freezer bags for best quality and odor protection. Package — flat — in freezer bags to hasten freezing and make it easier to break off sections as needed. Express out the air and place bags on cookie sheets or metal pans until onions are frozen. Then, restack bags to take up less room.
  3. Use in cooked products, such as soups and stews, ground meat mixtures, casseroles, etc. For most dishes, frozen onions may be used with little or no thawing. (Will keep 3-6 months.)

 

References:

University of Nebraska – freezing raw tomatoes

University of Nebraska – freezing raw peppers

University of Nebraska – freezing onions

 

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Spaghetti Sauce (from scratch)

wpid-20151031_181036.jpgThis is a great recipe for basic marinara-style sauce. I’ve adapted it from a few sources and added a few special ingredients of my own.
I love to make several batches, and this recipe will make approximately 30 servings (I like to freeze it in 3-cup portions which is about the same as a 650ml store-bought jar of sauce).

Mandolin2My first full batch of this recipe was my first use of my German-made mandolin – what a great implement for processing large amounts of vegetables (particularly during end-of-season harvest time, when vegetables are available in large quantities at bargain prices). If you’ve never seen these devices, check them out. I find it fantastic since it’s easy to use and simple to clean up (not much more work than a cutting board and knife).

 

Ingredients

1/4 cup olive oil
3 medium onions finely chopped
2 or 3 sweet peppers finely chopped
1 hot pepper finely chopped (optional)
4 cloves of garlic finely chopped
12 cups of tomatoes chopped (best to use a couple of varieties of tomatoes, perhaps even a couple cans of diced tomatoes)
3 (12 oz) cans of tomato paste
3 tablespoons of brown sugar
4 teaspoons salf
1 tablespoon of dried oregano
2 teaspoons of dried basil (or 1/8 – 1/4 cup of freshly chopped basil)
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste)

Directions

  1. 20151101_134134In a large pot, add the oil and heat
  2. Saute onions, garlic and peppers until tender
  3. Add remaining ingredients
  4. Bring to a boil
  5. Reduce to simmer for 2 hours, partially covering the pot, and stirring occasionally
  6. Store in freezer bags (3 cup servings)
  7. When thawing for use later, simply add in meat/mushrooms/sausage etc. To make your favourite sauce